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and are receiving reports this morning of the attacks against the united states embsy in cairo and the u.s. consulate in bengazi in libya. in libya, our ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in the service of our nation. our thoughts and sympathies today are with the families of these brave americans. these attacks remind us of the sacrifices made on a daily basisaway foreign service officers, diplomatic security personnel and our marine security guards. i joi my colleagues in strongly condemning the murder of these innocent americans, and i strongly support employing every available tool at our dissal to ensure t safety of americans overseas and to hunt down those responsible for these attacks. yesterday, we commemorated the anniversary of the attacks of september 11, and today we are reminded that brave americans serve us every day at the risk of their own lives. we honor the americans we lost in libya and we will stand united in our response. among the things we can agree on in washington is that the attacks on the u.s. and its representatives ll be met with r
the united states six years atoka in my first i told the mexican people that it was possible to transform mexico. i say that we could turn it into a postal nation with a competitive economy and we could build a first site to with more opportunities for everyone. we have mexico in a safer nation with a strong will of dhaka. i can tell you today we have made great strides and help put mexico on the track to make these decisions a reality. i would like to share some reflections on health care we have a stronger nation. let me start by talking of the transformation of the mexican economy. as you know, we have to confront the global kinnock crisis in memory. mexico was particularly vulnerable because our ties to the american economy which was at the epicenter of the crisis years ago half to and we took the necessary measures to prevent this crisis from becoming a major catastrophe. in doing so we were guided with three basic. financial discipline, economic freedom and increased competitiveness in we stayed after the country. first mexico has strong economic fundamentals. many countries put in
for the country. against perceived internal and external dangerous forces. israel, united states, first at the regime. vicious than enough of that over the decades and afterward he went from credence to that notion, that paranoia. so the syrian population made this bargain with the regime that they would give freedoms in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the re
be a movement for the united states to withdraw to fortress america, to renounce our -- our -- our service to the world in helping these countries achieve the same democracy and freedom that our forefathers strived for? i do not mean to use his death as any kind of political agenda, but i think my friend and i remember him well enough to know that the worst outcome of this tragedy wod be for the united states to withdraw. in fact, i am confident that if he were here, he would be urging us to get right back in, get -- bring these extremists to justice and press on with the democracy and freedom that the people of libya deserve and have earned at great loss of blood and treasure. mr. lieberman: mr. president, i couldn't agree more with my friend from arizona. it would -- it would really dishonor the service of chris stevens and the three other americans who served us in libya if their murders by these extremists led us to retrench and pull out of libya and stop supporting the new libyan government, democratically elecd, pull out of other parts of the arab world. that would be exactly the opp
that it is going as you will understand the united states we understand of madison and jefferson and washington how they form the country but would be a very good basis for understanding what was going on in the united states so current china was very much shaped by deng xiaoping. he came to power in 1978 and was the dominant person right up until 1992 for the period of about 14 years. what i thought i would do in the brief time today i was told to not talk for more than 20 minutes would be to talk about some of the forces that shaped what he was and what he did to transform china because 1978 the country that he inherited had a per capita income of less than $100 per capita. now is estimated somewhere rs/6000 and it's on the path of that he is headed on. there is almost no migration from the countryside in the city and since he came perhaps 200 million have moved from the countryside to the town and the city. when he came to power the country was still involved in the cultural revolution and the relevant nettie toward each other and he worked to unite the country to set it on the new path. what ar
outgoing mexican president felipe calderon on his country's relations with the united states. >> president obama held a campaign rally in milwaukee over the weekend, one month before early voting begins in this battleground state of wisconsin. [cheers and applause] >> this was the president's first visit to the state since february. a recent quinnipiac university/new york times/cbs poll of likely voters in wisconsin found president obama leading mitt romney 51-45%. this is about half an hour. [cheers and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause] >> hello, wisconsin! [cheers and applause] oh! hi! you guys sound like you're fired up already! [cheers and applause] it is good to be back in milwaukee! [cheers and applause] first of all, it's good to be back because this is the closest i've been the home in a couple of months -- [cheers and applause] i was thinking about hopping on the freeway and just driving on down. you know, hour and a half, maybe a little shorter with a motorcade, you know? [laughter] i am also glad to be in milwaukee because before i came out here, i was able to have an
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
-year plan. how many of you have studied the plan? you know, in the united states and u.s. context, the entire idea of five-year plans sounds preposterous. they are taken serious in china and this one in particular is like a chain in the curve for the chinese economy. it says basically looking backwards china's successes have almost been enough low-wage factoriescome the building, road roads and all the rasputin the future under this plan they want to have more high-tech. they want infotech industry from a biotech industry coming clean take energy and aerospace industry. so the idea of the country can move from its current level of technology is something played out in this industry and a lot of others. another major theme you see about china in this field and others is the style of what i think of as the real estate centric theory of modernization. if you look for an explanation of almost anything happening in china now and say well why is the seaport go in there? why is this ancient village removed? why is x, y or z happening? real estate deals may not be the only answer, but usu
rising home prices. all these are more important to the united states than what's going on in europe. >> mark, how do you see it? you invested in europe these days or no? >> a little bit, maria. you know, i guess the thing i would say about europe and soon to watch on our shores is you're going to pay more and get less. i look forward to the dislocation between price and value. i think there are a few opportunities in europe selectively. a company we own called securitas, which is a man-guarded service. it trades for about 50 krona. we think it's worth 72. we get about a 6% dividend yield. there's an example where you can find opportunity. >> everybody's looking for yield in an environment where we can't find any. rick, what are you seeing there today? >> you had a great point. everybody's looking for yields, so everybody needs to take more risk. that's the plan. the problem is, when you take more risk to get more reward, you have more risk. you know, take the word austerity and throw it out. use the word reform. one guest just said central bankers are doing all the heavy lifting. be
. very clearly. we will wipe out israel. when the united states of america then we go after this sunday people, the christians to send you a message. you have to wake up many people think not in my backyard. if it is it is really is a year backyard. what is the connection between hezbollah and iran and venezuela? why do they work together and they fly a the slides from here to caracas? hatred of the shared values the american values of what you represent. this comes from our brand and will come to the shores of the united states. we will all remember the attack of 9/11. and to attack the towers of new york city, i can share with all due respect to our intelligence if al qaeda wanted to attack the towers but they chose to attack in the u.s. in washington d.c. to send a message. so for that i hope the united states whoever is elected will take a decision to stop the nuclear race today. something very interesting when you look at the arab leaders they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear so for that matter i think we would like to take action for the u.s. to sit idly by israel has to do i
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
action to put our fiscal health in order and obviously that is a bigger challenge in the united states were adding a trillion dollars in debt year after year -- though how does it unplayed? >> that could serve as a source of entertainment to the canadian community. >> how do you think the u.s. does play out? >> i think that is a big risk and the frustrating thing in the u.s. is that the core is so strong and so good. you know we have illegal immigration by the way the average -- no growth over five years which includes a downturn but basically it's a big economy in 2% on a big economy as a big number and i think it goes. but it's very -- these problems are self-inflicted to a great extent and it makes it all the more frustrating and it must be frustrating to watch last summer with the debt ceiling and save why don't you compromise and why don't you get this done? i would say it's sometimes more frustrating to watch something that you can undo. it's like seeing it spiraling and you wish you could stop it and is within everybody's power to stop it. i think it's a political system to some
president of the united states, we will stop it. i will not cut our commitment to our military. >> the president once again blasted romney's hidden camera comments on the 47% of americans he dubbed victims of government dependence. >> i don't think we can get very far with leaders who writeoff half the nation as a bunch of victims who never take responsibility for their own lives. >> 47% of the people vote for the president no matter what. who -- >> the obama campaign turned romney's secretly recorded remarks into a devastating new ad claiming the gop nominee's words under the families and veterans. >> so my job is not to worry about -- they should take personal responsibility. >> romney two days in a row out to link national security to the nation's sluggish recovery. he's seizing on new economic data revising down the 2nd quarter gdp. >> this is not just one quarter. this has been going on now for years. china's growing much faster than we. russia's growing faster than we. our economy needs to be reinvigorated. >> but not all the numbers paint a gloomy picture. the labor depa
at this crisis? speak of the united state unites attacked september 11, 11 years ago, and united states attacked september 11 yesterday. what does that mean? the united states territories, the embassy, it was egypt and libya. were they coordinated attacks? when the president came out, as you rightly did, he should have followed that by saying these attacks are not going to be tolerated, we will hold the host governments responsible for this. some indication even in egypt there was advanced warning these attacks are coming which is why the americans had gotten out of that embassy. the president of the united states needs to say to those countries who will hold you responsible, have to protect our people, you have to have better protection of our people and if you don't do that we will reassess our relationship with you because if you don't stand strong right now, this is what happened to jimmy carter and why ronald reagan was elected. jimmy carter did not do something strong. he apologized, said let's try to negotiate and that is the kind of response i heard from president obama. dagen: did we ha
in the united states who have been educated in our schools, to give them the opportunity to stay here. you know, wouldn't we rather be known as a country of dreamers, than a country of illegal aliens? [applause] and as we saw last night, this is the commander in chief who finally brought osama bin laden to justice. [applause] now that is presidential leadership. but even before barack obama was elected president, we knew he was going to be a great leader. we knew it when he chose joe biden as his running mate. [applause] joe was the perfect choice, because like the president, he had lived the american dream, going from humble middle-class roots, to the united states senate, to the vice presidency of the united states. [applause] and we all know from his incredible speech last night that he has been side by side with the president's, fighting to make sure that we open the doors of opportunity for all americans, working to create good jobs and to invest in education, to make health care and retirement and schools affordable for everyone. it is what he has fought for his entire career. [applause]
in the british foreign office in the united states should have the capacity to keep our eye on more than one war upon. >> i suppose the key was to negotiate. it didn't work that way. if it didn't work that way in a western democracy, the do very little chance of the work in that way in afghanistan, therefore the extent to which there is an engagement, whether it's track to her otherwise with the taliban if they think they're important because you can wait a long, long time for the kind of progress in security level, which may never happen. >> you're absolutely right. i keep using that as an example. there was no military plan that has that is the subject to defeating the insurgency. our strategy is not defeating the insurgency. >> affair in which he said among the afghan leadership. >> i think they generally want assessment. they have huge differences on what terms are prepared to accept. if you talk to afghan women, they are very worthy attempts of settlement will be to their detriment. you also talk and they don't want to give up the amount of power they've had. they've had more power than the
his speech. netanyahu has been critical of the united states, saying there is no more time for diplomacy on iran's nuclear program. plus, mira sore vino stops about her crusade to stop human trafficking and tomorrow you will meet a teacher who struggled a teacher that strug d for years and then found a way to profit off of what she was doing in the classroom and it turned her in to a millionaire. it's an amazing story. it is "out front" tomorrow. here's piers morgan tonight. >>> tonight, nuclear threat in the east, mahmoud ahmadinejad says he is the victim. >> no one feels secure or safe, even those who have stockpiled thousands of atomic bombs and other arms in their arsenals. >> we hear what will it take to keep iran from getting the bomb. >> i don't see victims. i see hard-working ohioans. >> we can't afford four more years like the last four years. we have to get the economy going again. >> campaigns go head to head. what the latest means. nate silver will be asked if romney can win and deepak chopra, wesley clark and ameerah al-taweel. things get lively at the clinton
saying ice free in as early as 202. we have a responsibility. in the united states we are about the only educated country or oecd country that will argue that this isn't primarily a human problem. somehow, we have to take this take this political system and move it the right way. it's time for the united states, in this area, to lead. we didn't lead. we should have led. after kyoto, it is time right now, urgently for the united states to team with china and lead us forward, out of where we are in carbon and in to a new, responsibility as global citizens. >> united states doesn't have to go through a battle to lead the world. you are already leading. you have other leaders who are emerging out there, which is fine. this is a globalized world. so just embrace them. keep inspiring and keep doing what you are doing. believe in young people. believe in technology and science and have leaders like them lead the way. >> it's a marathon. it's a marathon, not a sprint. i'm 37. i've done all the things you can possibly do in music, and i never thought i would be able to do those things when i was
through small local banks or sometimes large local banks. what happens is people in the united states and europe who fund these things generally go through an intermediary so they give their money to institutions such as kiva, a famous one that you -- deutsche bank, citibank, the traditional wall street companies, dedicated microfinance funses such as blue orchard, the biggest one in the order, and then you have the foundations. so in d.c. we have two examples, such as the foundation u.s.a. and calvert foundation but there are whole hot of these institutions. you give your money to one of these intermediary asks they apparently invest this in the -- in your best interests and in the best interests of the poor by channeling this money to these small banks in developing countries that are going to do effective microfinance. that's the idea. that's the theory. >> well, this book has been promoted and my understanding is that members of the church congregations, people making responsible investments are flocking to this opportunity. tell us about some of the people providing the money. >>
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
reach its foreign policy goals while under the wing of the united states which he says count always have israel's -- doesn't always have israel's best interests at heart. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> shalom, good evening, everybody. it is my pleasure to be here with you, especially when you have such great weather in washington. almost like jerusalem at this time of the year. i am very happy to see so many people coming and showing an interest in my book, and i would like in the next 20 minutes to share with you not what you're going to read in the book, but what's behind the ideas. but first i want to think we all can agree that's what's happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. and because we are in the middle east today being attacked, so you have to ask yourself why those people are against the jewish nation in the middle east. the arab against israel not because of the land that we so-called occupied. we are being attacked be
howard taft was both supreme court chief justice and before that a president of the united states, came from cincinnati. cincinnati in some ways was a southern town because it was oriented, its trade was with the south along the ohio river and the mississippi. it also was the home of the underground railroad. so if you could get slaves -- the slaves could get out of kentucky and cross the ohio river, in some ways they were safe in ohio. and then they could be dispersed to other places where they were even safer in ohio. so taft was from here. harding was from marion, ohio, just north of columbus here. william mckinley who was elected president in 1896 was an ohioan. so a whole bunch of ohioans. james garfield, again, was an ohioan. he was a short-lived president because he was assassinated in office. but you have a set of presidents who came during this period, many many after the civil war all the way up into the 1920s. and then it sort of stops. they were pulling presidents from other parts of the country afterwards. they tend to be more moderate, for one thing. they don't tend to be
to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington d.c., september 12, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the senate is now considering the motion to proceed to s. 3547, the veterans job corps act. 70 minutes will be equally divided this morning between the two leaders or their designees with the republicans controlling the first half and the majority controlling the final half. we'll begin consideration of veterans jobs bill today. it's unfortunate that we're having to go through all this, another couple of filibusters on this bill. but th
in vermont. of course, the company's first set up. and we still make 70% of our products in the united states. cheryl: and you've been there for 25 years, we should mention to our viewers, you yourself have been with this company for 25 years. one of the most impressive things, i think s you've been able to keep 70% of your manufacturing in the united states at plants in the united states. what's the secret? >> well, the secret is what you have also indicated is the fact of being around for a long time and also thinking long term, making investments. you know, manufacturing in the united states is not easy, and if you're not thinking long term, if you're not continuously investing, it's not possible. because, you know, we have great people, we've got great history. we, in fact, have 73 locations in china and 60% of the product we're shipping from the united states to china. in furniture which is, you know, not made by robots. we still have a lot of labor even though we have a lot of, lot of technology that we've introduced. so i think it's a question of quality, it's a question of craftmanshi
in the united states, but done in france which is a modern labor market where i think there are some lessons. the code-talkers actually convinced the french government to do something i hope we can convince our -- co-authors actually convince the french government to do something i hope we can convince our government to do, which is to experiment with widespread unemployment services programs and look at what the effects on the labor market are not just by randomizing an individual having access to the program, but breaking france up into different geographic areas of labor markets and providing 100% of the people access in some areas, in some areas , in some areas 55%, some areas 25%. if you do that randomly, on average, if you're in an area where a lot of other people use this program, does that have a negative effect on you? what they found is in tight labor markets, basically the programs really helped people get into jobs more quickly. when the labor market is weak, is largely a game of musical chairs. one person getting a job makes another person have a more difficult time. thinking ab
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
to the protests in a number of countries. let me state very clearly, and i hope it is obvious that the united states government had absolutely nothing to do with this video. we absolutely reject its content and message. america's commitment to religious tolerance goes back to the very beginning of our nation. as you know, we are a place that is home to people of all religions. many come to this country seeking the right to exercise their own religion, including of course millions of muslims. we have the greatest respect for people of faith. to us and to me personally, this video is disgusting and reprehensible. as i said yesterday, there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. we condemn the violence that has resulted in the strongest terms. we greatly appreciate that many muslims in the united states and around the world have spoken out on this issue. violence has no place in religion and is no way to honor religion. islam respects the fundamental dignity of human beings. it is a violation of that fundamental dignity to wage attacks on innocents. as long
the danger confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi director robert mueller acknowledged the immense challenge facing the bureau stating: it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate a terrorist attack. developing intelligence, developing facts. in the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts and painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the director's statement. and then on november the 5th, 2009, a gunman walked into the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas, and shouted the classic jihadist term, allahu akbar, and opened fire on soldiers and civilians. he killed 14 and wounded 42 others. this was the most horrific terrorist attack on u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will examine the facts of the fort be hood case as we know them -- fort hood case as we know them
. >> on now to some sobering news in the united states and a convention of party hang over in the form of disappointing jobs numbers. president barack obama promised to lead the nation "to a better place" and warned the road ahead would be difficult. it was revealed the u.s. economy added only 96,000 jobs, well below the 125,000 economists had been expecting. the unemployment rate dropped but the weak data played in to the hands of the opposition. >> republican presidential hopeful met romney said the jobs report proves obama's policies have not worked and no president since the great depression has been reelected with unemployment over 7.2%. >> more on the u.s. presidential election in a moment, but first on to the markets and weaker than expected unemployment data which was in focus. many are betting it will prompt further stimulus by the u.s. federal reserve. as a result, european stocks climbing higher ending their biggest weekly rally in three months. conrad sent us this summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> bad news from the american labor market's leading to buying stock
. that's important. because that distinguishes him from the united states senate which also has a legal obligation to submit a budget and has refused to do so for the last three years. you wonder why it is we can't come together on funding priorities, madam speaker, three years the senate has said we are not going to tell you what we are interested in doing. we are not going to provide you with any ideas. and because we won't move it, the house product can't move, the president doesn't have anything to work with, and you see the kind of economic turmoil that we are in today. but the president to his credit has submitted a budget each and every year with his priorities. this is the budget he submitted for 2012. this was just last february, the law required it. he complied with it. but he's running for re-election and he's got his fingers on the pulse of the american people, but what they need and what they desire and what they want from the united states government, all tuned towards an election in november anti-budget that he submitted -- and the budget that he submitted raidses taxes a
.2 million people infected with hiv here in the united states, jim and about 20% to 25% of those individuals are unaware that they're affected. and what's most concerning is it's those individuals who are affected but unaware. they're responsible for 50 to 70% of the forward transmission. so our objective is to put it out there to make it easier for people to know their history status. >> do you envision a world where someone has unprotected sex, they would go to the drugstore and get this within 72 hours? >> we have spent a lot of time making sure consumers can understand the appropriate use of the product. it's not designed to detect infection immediately after someone is infected. but it's the exactly the same technology that's used in doctors offices and the public health centers. this is the rapid leading history test in the united states and now we're making it available to consumers. >> our show has been focused on hepatitis c. you've got a test for it, but you just don't think -- you talk about it as a billion dollar opportunity, but it's not as big for your company as this one. >> w
and the united states. work with those people and have the keystone pipeline and, but, the missing link, in this whole thing is that we've never had an energy plan in america. melissa: you are right about that. >> we have no energy plan. melissa: you're right about all that. that is great setup because we have the ceo transcanada coming up. boone pickens thanks for coming on the show tonight. we really appreciate your time. >> sure. melissa: transcanada submit as new route for the keystone xl pipeline. can the plan avoid getting quashed by the white house? boone talked about how much we need this. i will ask transcanada's ceo in a first on fox interview coming up next. >>> plus, ecb mario draghi sends bulls on a tear. look at that. is his debt crisis fix a short term high for investors? piles of money printed by the e.u. coming up. ♪ . [ thunder crashes ] [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit fl
about this today. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. we're working with the government of libya to secure or diplomates. i've directed my administration to increase our security at diplomatic posts around the world. >> the attacks of libya and egypt underscore that the world remain aes dangerous place and that american leadership is still sorely needed. in the face of this violence, america cannot shrink from the responsibility to lead. leadership is necessary to ensure that events in the region don't spin out of control. >> all this happening as israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu is using the strongest language to date about using force to stop iran from developing a nuclear weapon. this brings up the issue of making the u.s. less dependent on foreign oil. should we get off of middle eastern oil? chris, you first. all of this make you nervous about how much we depend on that region for our energy needs? what's the answer? >> well, you know, you look at saudi arabia providing 20% of the oil imports for this country. amer
.c. too do -- to do that. since joining the united states senate in january of 2011, he has established himself as a constitutional conservative pledging to work every day to reform government and end business as usual here in our nation's capital. in fact, i'm proud to say that he has received a 100% score on the frc action scorecards for the 112th congress, voting to defund obama care and planned parenthood. [applause] he is a devoted father and husband. married to his wife, kelly, over 21 years. together they have the joy of raising three teenage boys, william, duncan, and robert. amidst a busy schedule, he regularly volunteers to coach their baseball, babble -- basketball teams. please join me from the great state of texas -- kentucky. well, his dad is from texas. and they bonet both stand for protecting the constitution of which i am extremely grateful. please welcome senator rand paul! [cheers and applause] ♪ >> can you believe the democrats had trouble getting god into the platform? sounds like there wasn't much dissension from this group. she said she wanted $100. she wrote a
was the biggest terrorist incident before 9/11 that the united states history had. a man who had been on my secret service detail had transferred there because he thought it would be a great place to raise his children. he was killed that day. along with other people. i had, like every politician, on occasion, gotten upset. and referred to government bureaucrats. i promised myself i would never use those two words together for the rest of my life. i would treat those people who serve our country with respect whether they are in uniform, law enforcement, fire fighters, and the other thing. [applause] that is it. if you are working for the future, i think the president's plan is better. i know the economic plan is better. and i know it will not amount to a hill of beans if you do not register and vote and get your friends to. so do it. god bless you all. [cheers and applause] ♪ >> have you visited the c-span campaign 2012 website? it can watch events from the campaign trail. you can also read what the candidates are saying on major issues like the economy, the deficit, national security, and immig
is at the center of economic growth in the united states, so don, ed, martin, stick around. we're going to continue this conversation after the break. you all know now the unemployment rate in america fell last month but before anyone celebrates, realize this is because many job seekers appear to have left the workforce. i'll show you the hard numbers on whether president obama is a job creation failure or success, after the break. [ male announcer ] now you can swipe... scroll... tap... pinch... and zoom... in your car. introducing the all-new cadillac xts with cue. ♪ don't worry. we haven't forgotten, you still like things to push. [ engine revs ] the all-new cadillac xts has arrived, and it's bringing the future forward. but between check-ups tartar builds. keep it clean with new listerine® ultraclean™. it's the only mouthwash with a new tartar control formula for a dentist clean feeling. ahhhhhhhh. [ male announcer ] new listerine® ultraclean™. power to your mouth™. throughout our entire lives. ♪ one a day men's 50+ is a complete multi-vitamin designed for men's health concerns as w
for the united states. >> allowing our own congress to check our moves. >> i'm not going to play ken rogoff in chess. ken is exactly right. this is actually washington. this is the nature of our political system. they always put off the tough decisions till the last minute. a little point of optimism. this week, the house senate, democrats and republicans, had a hearing on what to do about this tax system that ken and i have so much about that's an abomination, that's an albatross around the neck of the politicians. they said, next year, we've got to do this. and i think 2013 -- hold me to this promise -- i think next year, they do something really big on fixing the tax system. they have to deal with the amt, the estate tax, the tax cliff that's coming, all these things come to a fore in 2013. gets to the point, when will they fix it? when they're right up against the abyss? >> i think if there's a fairly decisive election result, the democrats win across the board or the republicans win across the board, yes. i'm not so sure. i'm just not so sure what they're going to do if we get stuck in
these great products. now, having said that the expansion of the united states is very slow. we are down to 1 1/2 to 2% of gdp expansion. that is, like phil and i talked many time, the lowest, slowest expansion we have ever had following a deep recession. clearly, one of the worst recessions we have ever been in. we are very pleased that we are recovering in the automobile industry and in ford's care the pent-up demand is incredible. the average age, phil, is like 11 years old now. these new vehicles you can get from ford, you can economically replace your older vehicle. so we are so just gratified that we invested during the toughest time and we have the products now to help lead this economic recovery but it is a slower recovery than we have had in the past, for sure. >> so what did you say? i don't mean to beat this into the ground, yes or no? is america in better shape now than it was four years ago? >> clearly not in the deep recession that we were and we are starting to recover. so, this is a very positive thing. the thing i like about the debate is what can we do to increase the rate o
energy strategy. the document calls for a nonnuclear country. but the united states has expressed deep concern over move. the policy chief of japan's ruling democratic party is visiting washington. seiji maehara met the u.s. deputy secretary of energy, daniel poneman, to brief him on the draft. the japanese government will take various steps and direct resources to halt all reactors by the 2030s. japan's future energy policy will be based on three principles. the operation of any nuclear plant will be limited to 40 years, suspended facilities will need to have their safety confirmed before they can resume operations, and no new reactors will be built. but the policy insists that nuclear reactors should be used as a transitional measure. maehara said poneman urged japan to minimize the negative impact of the policy on fossil fuel prices. poneman reportedly said japan should try to reduce its stocks of plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. maehara said poneman also told him the u.s. will support japan's efforts to diversify its energy sources. >>> it's hard for the world to really understan
and everything from police surveillance to amateur photography. in the united states, congress has told the u.s. airspace regulator to open up north america to drones by 2015. but are we ready for a world in which thousands of drones are patrolling our skies? >> they are the eyes and ears of the armed forces. a decade ago, less than 5% of u.s. military aircraft were unmanned. now 40% have no pilots onboard. many think the f-35 will be the last conventional fighters ever flown by the r.a.f. but the role of the drone is now changing. british skies are about to open up to thousands of civilian drones. who is watching the drone operators and how safe is this new technology? next to an army training zone in the british countryside is a glimpse of how drones could be used in the future. it might not look like the spy planes in afghanistan or yemen, but this is one of the first commercial uses of an unmanned aircraft in the u.k. itself. as the cost of digital cameras come down, some new applications are starting to become possible. >> 38,000 feet, 1,000 knots, 76%. >> these light-weight drones fly b
that word, the auto industry of the united states at that time? >> it sounds like rhetoric. but -- and it is rhetoric, i guess, because it's words. but i think they're actually factual words. president bush and hank paulson agree because they were the first ones to provide capital to the auto industry. if the government had not stepped in, these companies would have had to literally shut their doors, they would have run out of cash, had to lay off their workers. the suppliers would have gone down. ford would have gone down. the industry would have shut down. whether it would have ultimately liquidated would depend on what would have happened after that. >> that is not the case. and in fact we got some very strong numbers earlier this week. are you surprised at the strength of auto sales at this point? >> no, i'm not surprised because you need to sell 15 million cars a year in this country simply to keep the fleet from aging. and we have not done that now for over four years. this is unprecedented in american history. so you have a huge amount of pent-up demand for cars beca
american forces, became two-term president of the united states and the for some reason the los angeles press corps was paralyzed in place. so i stepped forward and i began asking questions of what i called, general eisenhower. i didn't call him the president because, to me had always been a general. we had really good exchange. and in which he said he wanted reagan to run as a favorite son in six at this it. -- '68. you thought that with be good for the party around good for the country. that was in his own way a shot at rich richard nixon. >> guest: boom, you write, one minute ike and man in gray flannel suit in the lonely crowd and next minute, tune on, tune in, drop out, time for we shall overcome and burn baby burn. while americans were walking on the moon, americans were dying in vietnam. there were assassinations and riots. jackie kennedy became jackie o. ty e-die shirts rpt martin luther king, jr. george wallace, tom hayden and. mick jagger and wayne newton. well you get the idea, boom. >> guest: i don't want to overstate this seldom in our recent history at least has there been
the very stylish, 34-year-old first lady of the united states surrounded by all these dashing people and then that came to an end. and the war began to heat up and suddenly the country seemed, seemed to come unhinged in a way. all the values of the world war ii generation come home with challenged within their own families. institutions of government, place of government in our lives. the idea of loyaltity and patriotism all went out the window. civil rights movement went from nonviolent movement led by dr. king depending on rule of law, it went to the streets. you know, violence in america is as as american as cherry pie. so it was a, it was a head-snapping time. there was no question about it and the fact that we emerged from it and reasonably good shape is still fairly astonishing to me. it is a real tribute to the tense aisle strength of this country in a lot of ways. >> host: i began my marriage, tom brokaw writes and my career as journalist in 1962, a straight arrow product of the 1960s. by the time decade was over i had my first taste of the marijuana, i had long hair and week
speech he would say the united states was the only country on earth where we put our hands over our hearts when we sing our national anthem, which was quickly disproved by just looking on youtube. people around the world going like this and singing their national anthem. he dropped at the very next day. he never said it again. >> he paid the price. >> maybe. >> i would say that is an example of actually changing behavior, which i think happens rarely and in small increments. >> i think the other thing we were talking about before the panel with brendan, the other thing we do not know, how many conversations are going on with campaign message people, with people making ads, with speechwriters, they are talking about wording. how often are they saying, if we say that, the fact checkers will get us? i suspect that is happening a lot. the only evidence i have of that is a column written by connie schultz, who is married to sherrod brown, who says that happens in the brown campaign. i suspect that is happening in many campaigns. there is so much fact checking going on, not just with our
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